Noodles

Glass noodles (sotanghon, vermicelli) with Sriracha and Chinese broccoli

If you’re a fan of the Korean japchae (jabchae, chapchae or chapchee), this is a simpler version. Less steps to perform, less ingredients to prepare, shorter cooking time. But the perfect blend of spicy, hot, sweet, salty and tangy that really makes Asian food stand out is still there. I just wouldn’t have it any other way.

If you’re a fan of the Korean japchae (jabchae, chapchae or chapchee), this is a simpler version. Less steps to perform, less ingredients to prepare, shorter cooking time. But the perfect blend of spicy, hot, sweet, salty and tangy which really makes Asian food stand out is still there.

I used pork for this noodle dish but you can use chicken. If you prefer a vegetarian or vegan version, use mushrooms. If using meat, I recommend that it be grilled. There’s just something incomparable about the smoky tones of grilled meat that adds a mysterious depth to it.

Glass noodles with Sriracha and Chinese broccoli
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
20 mins
 
Servings: 2
Author: Connie Veneracion
Ingredients
  • 50 grams glass noodles a.k.a. sotanghon or vermicelli
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable cooking oil
  • 4 cloves garlic minced
  • 1 half-inch knob ginger grated
  • 1 red onion thinly sliced
  • 1 small carrot julienned
  • 1 small bunch Chinese broccoli cut into two-inch lengths, stems and leaves separated
  • 1 cup grilled pork or chicken roughly chopped (use mushrooms for a vegetarian or vegan version)
  • 1 teaspoon patis (fish sauce)
  • 1 tbsp. rice vinegar
  • 1 and 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 2 tablespoons Sriracha
  • 1/3 cup bone broth preferably homemade
  • 1/2 teaspoon sesame seed oil
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds white or black, or a combination
Instructions
  1. Place the noodles in a wide bowl. Pour in enough warm water to cover. Leave for 10 minutes then drain well. You want to only partially soften the noodles at this point so drain them once they are pliable. Take the time while the noodles rehydrate to prepare the vegetables.
  2. Heat the cooking oil in a wok or frying pan. Saute the garlic, ginger and onion just until fragrant, about half a minute.
  3. Add the julienned carrot and Chinese broccoli stems. Stir fry for half a minute.
  4. Add the pork. Pour in the fish sauce, rice vinegar and Sriracha. Add the sugar. Stir.
  5. Add the drained noodles and Chinese broccoli leaves. Pour in the broth. Stir fry until the noodles have absorbed the broth.
  6. Pour in the the sesame seed oil. Toss to blend. Taste; adjust the seasonings if needed.
  7. Transfer the cooked noodle dish to a serving bowl or plate. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds. Serve hot.

If you’re a fan of the Korean japchae (jabchae, chapchae or chapchee), this is a simpler version. Less steps to perform, less ingredients to prepare, shorter cooking time. But the perfect blend of spicy, hot, sweet, salty and tangy which really makes Asian food stand out is still there.

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