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From the Noritake warehouse

Over at the Food Talk Community, member Lois posted this message: “If you’re a fan of Noritake, there’s a warehouse-type sale until June 13. Saw the sign near the MRT North Avenue station. I think they have a shop there.”

I’m not sure if there is a shop in the North Avenue area but I know that there is a Noritake warehouse in Marikina where lovely sales are held a few times each year. Well, at least during the past years. So, I replied to Lois: “For those who want to go: bring lots of tissue for wiping perspiration (it’s a warehouse and it’s darn hot inside) and alcohol for cleaning you hands (dusty!).” Not kidding. It’s a warehouse — a real warehouse — along Nangka Road in Marikina City (they do advertise in newspapers) and if your idea of shopping is limited to airconditioned comfort, well, it’s nothing like that.

But. BUT. The prices are just wonderful. Or were. I don’t know how much these things would cost now.

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This soup tureen cost me less than three hundred pesos back in 2003.

And how does it look in action?

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Perfect for my bulalo soup.

Here are some of the other things I bought back then.

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I really went nuts over the serving plates. I bought four, all oval, the three you see below.

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And you’ll see those plates in photos all over the food blog. Like these:

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There’s another oval platter, the one I like best:

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There were saucers too.

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And my favorite to this day — the gold edged breakfast plates and bowls.

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And they look gorgeous.

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If you’re going to the Noritake sale, remember that some of the items there are export overruns and some are rejects and they are priced accordingly. That is, overruns are a bit more expensive than rejects. If you’re lucky, you can buy the equivalent of whole sets but you’ll have to check each item carefully for damage or imperfection before paying. Buying cheap, after all, doesn’t mean you’re buying a lemon.

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