Soybean-based meat substitutes: where to buy and how to cook

casaveneracion.com tofu-skin

You don’t go almost vegetarian without reading up and learning about vegetarianism. And, from what I’ve read, meat substitutes, or “mock” meat if you prefer to call them that, fall under two broad categories: (1) soybean-based and (2) gluten-based. We haven’t tried any gluten-based meat substitutes yet but we have cooked four different kinds of soybean-based meat substitutes. Cooked properly, they are wonderful. But then again, I may have an advantage. To start with, I love tofu. If it’s true that tofu appreciation is an acquired thing, I’m glad that my father and my grandfather introduced me to tofu at a very young age. And that makes it easy for me to cook and appreciate soybean-based meat substitutes.

There are no recipes in this post (I’ll post the recipes separately and individually soon) — this is an introduction to soybean-based meat substitutes that we’ve tried, how they are prepared generally and some photos of how they can be served. Just to show you how appetizing vegetarian food can be. Appetizing both for the eyes and the mouth. Information about where to buy the vegetarian “meat” is at the end of the post.

Tofu skins

casaveneracion.com Tofu skin

Very inexpensive at PhP35.00 (that’s less than a dollar) per pack, that’s what a pack contains — enough for three people when combined with vegetables. It’s unseasoned so it needs a really good sauce to give it flavor.

casaveneracion.com tofu-skin3

I cut the layered tofu skins into strips and fried them over medium-low heat…

casaveneracion.com tofu-skin4

… until browned and crisp. I repeat — medium-low heat.

casaveneracion.com tofu-skin5

It’s best to drain them on paper towels to remove excess oil.

casaveneracion.com Fried tofu skin and vegetables with sweet and sour sauce

I served the crisp tofu skins with mixed vegetables, quail eggs and sweet sour sauce.

On page two, a more generic soybean-based meat substitute that can be cut into different sizes and shapes.





8 Comments

  • eden says:

    Thanks for this post Ms. Connie. I’m a frequent visitor of this website and I’ve tried most of your recipes (which my family loves, btw). Until the third quarter of last year when my doctor advised me to refrain from eating meat, I consciously avoided your website because just looking at the pictures of the dishes I long to cook is too tempting for me.

    But thanks be to FB! Since I’m a fan of your Facebook page, I saw this post from the news feed and immediately clicked the link. Wow! My heart (and tummy) is leaping with joy! My favorite “cook” now serves healthier recipes. I just love you Ms. Connie :)

    Anyway, I’ll go to these places you suggested. The only place I know where I buy my vegie-meat from is at the canteen of the Manila Adventist Hospital in Pasay. They’re good but it’s good to know there are other options :)

    Thanks again and I hope you will post more vegetarian recipes.

  • Antonette says:

    Dear Ms. Connie,
    Thank you for this new post. : ) My questions now answered … :) I enjoy exploring and experimenting with new ingredients. And those soybean-based meat substitutes sure look yummy. :) I once made tofu patties made from tofu by-producs. I can’t remember what it’s called though. Those tofu patties are commonly on offer in the food shops here in Japan. loooove tofu ! I also love tofu skin. Here it’s called “yuba”. It’s pretty pricey here though. :(

  • yes, yes, thank you very much for all this information.. :)

  • joy says:

    You can also try the products of country vegefoods.. I buy them too with their wide variety of products… from soya milk, vegemeats, vegesausage, vegefranks, vegetapa, tofu and even vegetarian chichiria and most of all their delicious taho… you can search them out in their FB page… happy vegetarian eating to us! Thanks connie for your recipes… love them!

  • louie pacia says:

    Hi, I was wondering if they have any deliveries for soybean meat or any other please to buy the meat?

  • Eli Oabel says:

    Hi, Ms. Connie! Thank you for your posts that helps people find their way around some cooking ingredients that we normally don’t find in most supermarkets.

    I am a Thai cuisine lover and would like to start cooking them again when I retire. Where do I find fresh supplies of galangal & kaffir leaves in the Philippines? Galangal paste will do but I also couldn’t find them. Will citrus leaves substitute for kaffir? I remember, my folks add them for “alamang sauce w/ coconut” and it kinda taste the same as I recall.

    Finally, are there stores here that supply them commercially? Fresh or perhaps bottled? Ah, and the pink lime paste! Any leads?

    Thanks & more power!

    Eli

    • I’ve never been able to source fresh galangal so I use bottled. We have a kaffir lime tree, and I just pick leaves from it.

      I don’t know what you mean by “citrus leaves” — there are so many varieties of citrus.

      I only publish info about personal experiences. If I’ve come across an interesting ingredient, I normally post about it here.

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