Do you reuse empty jars? We do!

In the tripe, lettuce and tomato sandwich post, there is a photo of cooked tripe stored in an ice cream gallon. Reader Ken_L commented, “Is that a recycled ice cream container I see in the second picture? Thank you for reassuring me I am not totally kuripot for re-using plastic containers.” And I replied that, yes, we re-use what we can, plastic and glass.

It’s true. There was a time when I’d buy glass jars and plastic containers in sets (I had every item in the Tupperware catalog, truth be told), store stuff in them and they lined the counters and cabinets in the kitchen. They looked so pretty, all uniform like that! But the thing about sets is that when you lose one, you really don’t feel happy about those that remain. It’s a feeling of incompleteness.

But, in the kitchen, that is inevitable. No matter how careful you are, the constant handling, the washing and re-washing… Everything is breakable — hard plastic, ceramic, glass… After a while, I just got tired of buying jars and containers in sets.

Naturally, the time came when I ran out of containers. And I’d pick up whatever clean container I could get my hands on. Without realizing it, a habit was formed. It wasn’t until I re-arranged the containers on a shelf recently did I realize that, hey, the pasta containers (Folgers coffee jars) match! Not bad.

If you’re like me who likes the visual appeal of uniform containers, here’s a tip. If there are items that you buy regularly (coffee, mayonnaise, olive oil, etc.) and you tend to buy the same brand every time, you can actually accrue enough to create sets.

Update at 10.40 p.m. More photos.

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My homemade mustard sauce is now in an empty bottle of olive oil with a spout.

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The yeast is in an empty peanut butter jar.

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The brown sugar is in an empty jar of mayonnaise.